Islamic Architecture

I find Islamic Architecture to be beautiful and fascinating. Symmetry, arched doorways, intricate motifs and beautiful colours are some things that many examples of Islamic Architecture have in common. At the same time there is a wide diversity in Islamic Architecture around the world. Here are some examples from my travels in four different countries in order of when they were built:

Kairouan, Tunisia. The Great Mosque of Kairouan, established in 670 AD.

 

Marrakech, Morocco. The Koutoubia Mosque, first built in the 12th century and the Ben Youssef Madrasa, founded in the 14th century.

 

Mazar-i-Sharif, Afghanistan. Shrine of Hazrat Ali, built in the 15th century.

 

Thatta, Pakistan. Jamia Masjid of Thatta aka Shah Jahan Mosque, 17th century.

 

16 thoughts on “Islamic Architecture

  1. I liked it, too, and it inspired me to do a similar one or ones (s). I’ll start with Western Islamic which will also include Kairouan, which I visited with a buddy on a hot summer day in 1971. There was no one there but us!

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    1. Thanks for stopping by! It is hard to pick a favourite. I like them all for different reasons – Mughal for the overall shapes, Persian for the tilework, Andalusian for the ornate carving. Which is yours?

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      1. I’d have to go with Andalusian – just the hybrid nature of numerous cultural influences coming together and creating something great. Mughal in second place.

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  2. Beautiful pictures! The first (and so far only) time I saw something like this was when we visited Seville and saw the Alcazar Gardens. I’m curious what you think of Christopher Alexander’s Pattern “Main Entrance” and my socio-technical analogue which I call “Context-Setting Entrance” which should put visitors in the right mood; set the right tone; help them behavior “appropriately.” Comments welcome. – John

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    1. Thanks for stopping by. Had a brief look at your post. It is very interesting but will take some time to digest, so I’ll have to stop by again later! Thanks for sharing.

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